It’s critical to have working brake lights on your car.

I have noticed many vehicles on the roads these days that have no brake lights at all. I was behind a  truck this morning, not a single brake light came on whenever they hit the brakes.  

It’s critical to have working brake lights on your car. They’re a safety feature and a tool of courtesy to other drivers.  These lighting systems were designed to alert other drivers to what it is that the vehicle is doing. These systems have evolved along with the automobile to consist of systems like brake lights turns signals/indicators  ( I wonder if some people think these are automatic)  These systems are not just there for other drivers safety but you as well  

We understand that it is difficult to press the brake pedal and look at the brake lights at the same time so here are few simple tricks that you can do to check and see if the brakes lights are working.  

But you can avoid all those problems by testing your brake lights once in a while — a couple of times a year is sufficient. It’s especially important to do a test before setting in. If your brake lights aren’t working, fix them immediately for safety’s sake.

It’s simple enough to test your brakes. Just have a friend stand behind the car while you step on the brake pedal and have him or her tell you if everything looks OK. If you’re working alone, rig up a mirror or lay a broomstick on the pedal and tuck it into the seat, then walk behind the car and look for yourself. And don’t forget to check all your brake lights. Cars built in recent years feature three brake lights — one on either side in the rear, both of which are implanted in the rear bumper, and a “cyclops” light in the back window.

Brake lights, of course, depend on a car’s electrical system, which runs on a series of switches and fuses to protect circuits. If one or more of your brake lights isn’t working properly, it could mean one of three things: The brake light system fuse is blown, the brake light bulbs are burned out or the brake light wiring switch is broken. All of these issues are easy to troubleshoot.

Testing the Brake Light System Fuse

If none of your three brake lights is working, it’s doubtful that all of the individual bulbs have burned out. It’s far more likely you have an electrical system problem. It may sound complicated and expensive, but don’t worry. Odds are the electrical system trouble is nothing more than a failed brake light system fuse.

Each part of the car’s electrical system corresponds to a fuse, which protects it from amperage overload; if one electrical component blows out, the rest of the car doesn’t get fried. If the fuse fails, electricity can’t reach the lights, which may be in fine working order otherwise.

Like all fuses, the brake light system fuse can be found in the power distribution centre, which is under the dashboard or tucked away underneath the hood. Ever heard of the power distribution centre? It’s just the technical name for a fuse box. Using your car’s manual, locate the fuse that correlates to the brake lights.

You’ll need a connect test light for the next step (you can get one at any auto parts store.) Turn your car’s ignition to the “on” position, grab the connect test light and attach it to the ground, like a dash or the body of the car, and gently press the tip of the tester to each of the fuse’s two ends. Now, press down lightly on the gas pedal. Does the test light illuminate? If so, the fuse is functional, and the problem most likely is a used-up brake light bulb. If, however, the test light illuminates when the connection is only pressed against one side of the fuse, the fuse is faulty. If the test light fails to light at all, regardless of where it’s connected to the fuse, you need to replace the fuse.

But wait, you’re not done — once you put in a new fuse, you’ll need to test it again. If both lights trigger, the fuse is working and the repair is complete. If the new fuse doesn’t work while you have a foot on the pedal, the circuit itself is shorted out. That’s a more complicated and expensive fix, which will need to be handled by a professional mechanic. If you’re lucky, maybe you just need a new light bulb. 

Replacing a brake light bulb is a simple task. Generally, you’ll go in through the trunk of the car or the bonnet (check your manual for specifics, especially for the cyclops light change-out procedure). First, gently remove any casing or bulb trim that might be present and set it aside. Next, unscrew the bulb as you would any light bulb. Inspect the housing of the bulb, as well as the filament inside. Is the filament blackened and broken? Then you’re going to need a new bulb. Is the bulb cracked? You’ll need to replace it.

So we ask you, PLEASE be a safe and courteous driver. Not only should you have your exterior bulbs checked, but use your turn signals/indicators any time you turn or change lanes.

FOR SAFE RELIABLE MOTORING….. Car Problems and Solutions.

You are driving along the highway one day when you find your vehicle slowing down and eventually coming to a halt. You step out of your vehicle to find out what the problem is, but you can’t seem to figure out where the car defects are and what is the cause of these sudden malfunctions. Even the most skilled and competent vehicle owner will experience his fair share of mechanical issues and car problems.

The list of car faults is endless – from flat tyres, unstable steering wheels, and even a faulty engine, there are minor and major car issues that you might or might not be able to resolve on your own.

Reaching the destination safely is the best reward for any motorist! Should you encounter any motoring issues, remember that Drive Zimbabwe Roadside Assistance provides 24/7 Roadside Assistance Service for our Members and the motoring community. Whilst it’s possible to reduce your risk of breakdown, it’s an unfortunate reality that even the most expertly maintained and superbly driven vehicle may break down due to unforeseen circumstances. In these instances, Drive Zimbabwe Roadside Assistance breakdown cover can make all the difference. Call us or  Whatsapp at 0780 579 261/0718 084 297 / 0736 523 424 Email:info@drivezim.co.zw and Join Today. Follow us on  Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/105600827733427  and Twitter https://mobile.twitter.com/DriveZimbabwe  for more tips and guidance on how to keep yourself and your vehicle safe on the roads.

I have noticed many vehicles on the roads these days that have no brake lights at all. I was behind a  truck this morning, not a single brake light came on whenever they hit the brakes.  

It’s critical to have working brake lights on your car. They’re a safety feature and a tool of courtesy to other drivers.  These lighting systems were designed to alert other drivers to what it is that the vehicle is doing. These systems have evolved along with the automobile to consist of systems like brake lights turns signals/indicators  ( I wonder if some people think these are automatic)  These systems are not just there for other drivers safety but you as well  

We understand that it is difficult to press the brake pedal and look at the brake lights at the same time so here are few simple tricks that you can do to check and see if the brakes lights are working.  

But you can avoid all those problems by testing your brake lights once in a while — a couple of times a year is sufficient. It’s especially important to do a test before setting in. If your brake lights aren’t working, fix them immediately for safety’s sake.

It’s simple enough to test your brakes. Just have a friend stand behind the car while you step on the brake pedal and have him or her tell you if everything looks OK. If you’re working alone, rig up a mirror or lay a broomstick on the pedal and tuck it into the seat, then walk behind the car and look for yourself. And don’t forget to check all your brake lights. Cars built in recent years feature three brake lights — one on either side in the rear, both of which are implanted in the rear bumper, and a “cyclops” light in the back window.

Brake lights, of course, depend on a car’s electrical system, which runs on a series of switches and fuses to protect circuits. If one or more of your brake lights isn’t working properly, it could mean one of three things: The brake light system fuse is blown, the brake light bulbs are burned out or the brake light wiring switch is broken. All of these issues are easy to troubleshoot.

Testing the Brake Light System Fuse

If none of your three brake lights is working, it’s doubtful that all of the individual bulbs have burned out. It’s far more likely you have an electrical system problem. It may sound complicated and expensive, but don’t worry. Odds are the electrical system trouble is nothing more than a failed brake light system fuse.

Each part of the car’s electrical system corresponds to a fuse, which protects it from amperage overload; if one electrical component blows out, the rest of the car doesn’t get fried. If the fuse fails, electricity can’t reach the lights, which may be in fine working order otherwise.

Like all fuses, the brake light system fuse can be found in the power distribution centre, which is under the dashboard or tucked away underneath the hood. Ever heard of the power distribution centre? It’s just the technical name for a fuse box. Using your car’s manual, locate the fuse that correlates to the brake lights.

You’ll need a connect test light for the next step (you can get one at any auto parts store.) Turn your car’s ignition to the “on” position, grab the connect test light and attach it to the ground, like a dash or the body of the car, and gently press the tip of the tester to each of the fuse’s two ends. Now, press down lightly on the gas pedal. Does the test light illuminate? If so, the fuse is functional, and the problem most likely is a used-up brake light bulb. If, however, the test light illuminates when the connection is only pressed against one side of the fuse, the fuse is faulty. If the test light fails to light at all, regardless of where it’s connected to the fuse, you need to replace the fuse.

But wait, you’re not done — once you put in a new fuse, you’ll need to test it again. If both lights trigger, the fuse is working and the repair is complete. If the new fuse doesn’t work while you have a foot on the pedal, the circuit itself is shorted out. That’s a more complicated and expensive fix, which will need to be handled by a professional mechanic. If you’re lucky, maybe you just need a new light bulb. 

Replacing a brake light bulb is a simple task. Generally, you’ll go in through the trunk of the car or the bonnet (check your manual for specifics, especially for the cyclops light change-out procedure). First, gently remove any casing or bulb trim that might be present and set it aside. Next, unscrew the bulb as you would any light bulb. Inspect the housing of the bulb, as well as the filament inside. Is the filament blackened and broken? Then you’re going to need a new bulb. Is the bulb cracked? You’ll need to replace it.

So we ask you, PLEASE be a safe and courteous driver. Not only should you have your exterior bulbs checked, but use your turn signals/indicators any time you turn or change lanes.

FOR SAFE RELIABLE MOTORING….. Car Problems and Solutions.

You are driving along the highway one day when you find your vehicle slowing down and eventually coming to a halt. You step out of your vehicle to find out what the problem is, but you can’t seem to figure out where the car defects are and what is the cause of these sudden malfunctions. Even the most skilled and competent vehicle owner will experience his fair share of mechanical issues and car problems.

The list of car faults is endless – from flat tyres, unstable steering wheels, and even a faulty engine, there are minor and major car issues that you might or might not be able to resolve on your own.

Reaching the destination safely is the best reward for any motorist! Should you encounter any motoring issues, remember that Drive Zimbabwe Roadside Assistance provides 24/7 Roadside Assistance Service for our Members and the motoring community. Whilst it’s possible to reduce your risk of breakdown, it’s an unfortunate reality that even the most expertly maintained and superbly driven vehicle may break down due to unforeseen circumstances. In these instances, Drive Zimbabwe Roadside Assistance breakdown cover can make all the difference. Call us or  Whatsapp at 0780 579 261/0718 084 297 / 0736 523 424 Email:info@drivezim.co.zw and Join Today. Follow us on  Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/105600827733427  and Twitter https://mobile.twitter.com/DriveZimbabwe  for more tips and guidance on how to keep yourself and your vehicle safe on the roads.

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